Rock Hill, South Carolina








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A Taste of Rock Hill, South Carolina

did you know?
DID YOU KNOW THESE FACTS ABOUT ROCK HILL?
  1. Rock Hill   is the largest city in York County, South Carolina and the fourth-largest city in the state. The 2010 current population estimate is 71,154 residents, and the forecast for 2020 is near 100,000 residents.

  2. City limits signs proclaim that Rock Hill is a city with "no room for racism." The symbols of the city are the four "Civitas" statues on Dave Lyle Boulevard. Each of them hold discs that symbolize the four different industries in the city. The four Civitas statues located at the GateWay Plaza on Dave Lyle Boulevard were put up in April 1991. The 20-foot-tall bronze statues were created by NY artist Audrey Flack. A fifth Civitas statue was placed in the City Hall Rotunda a year later.

  3. Rock Hill was the setting for two significant events in the civil rights movement. In February 1961, nine African-American men went to jail at the York County prison farm after staging a sit-in at a segregated McCrory's lunch counter. Their offense was reported to be "refusing to stop singing hymns during their morning devotions". The event gained nationwide attention because the men followed an untried strategy called "jail, no bail," which lessened the huge financial burden civil rights groups were facing as the sit-in movement spread across the South. This event received widespread national news coverage, and the tactic was adopted by other civil rights groups. They became known as the Friendship Nine because eight of the nine men were students at Rock Hill's Friendship Junior College. Later that year, Rock Hill was the first stop in the Deep South for a group of 13 Freedom Riders who boarded buses in Washington, D.C., and headed South to test the 1960 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court outlawing racial segregation in all interstate public facilities. When civil rights leader John Lewis and another man stepped off the bus, they were beaten by a white mob.

  4. In 2002, Lewis, by then a U.S. congressman from Georgia, returned to Rock Hill, where he spoke at Winthrop University and was given the key to the city. On January 21, 2008, Rep. Lewis returned to Rock Hill again and spoke at the city's Martin Luther King, Jr., holiday observance, where Mayor Doug Echols officially apologized to him on the city's behalf for the Freedom Riders' treatment there.

  5. Rock Hill hosts several seasonal events. Each spring there is a festival called Come-See-Me which brings more than 125,000 people to the city each year from across the country. Come-See-Me was voted as the number one South Carolina Festival and has also appeared in Southern Living magazine. On Independence Day Rock Hill hosts its Red, White, and Boom Festival. Then a winter festival is held to celebrate Christmas which is called Christmasville Rock Hill that occurs every December in Downtown Rock Hill.

Radio Stations

WRCM 91.9 FM Wingate, NC Christian Contemporary
WPZS 92.7 FM Harrisburg, NC Gospel Music
W232AX (WRHI) 94.3 FM Rock Hill, SC News/Talk
WNKS 95.1 FM Charlotte, NC Top-40
WHQC 96.1 FM Shelby, NC Top-40
W243BY (WNOW) 96.5 FM Charlotte, NC Rhythmic Oldies
WPEG 97.9 FM Concord, NC Hip Hop
WQNC 100.9 FM Indian Trail, NC Urban Contemporary
WWDM 101.3 FM Sumter, SC Urban Contemporary
WBAV 101.9 FM Gastonia, NC Urban Contemporary
WFNZ 610 AM Charlotte, NC Sports
WZGV 730 AM Cramerton, NC Sports
WRHI 1340 AM Rock Hill, SC News/Talk
WGIV 1370 AM Pineville, NC Gospel Music
WDEX 1430 AM Monroe, NC Gospel Music
WGCD 1490 AM Chester, SC Gospel Music

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

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Demographics of Rock Hill, South Carolina

By Race

White

Black

Native American

Asian

Hispanic

Total Population

58.74%

37.33%

0.50%

1.39%

2.48%

Because Hispanics could be counted in other races, the totals above could possibly be more than 100%. If you would like a detailed listing of all ethnic groups in the U.S., please Click Here.

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submitted articles

Prostate Health Education Network (PHEN)

(Quincy, MA) July 27, 2017 The fifth Annual Prostate Health Education Symposium is scheduled for Freedom Temple Ministries on Saturday, August 12, at 8 a.m. and ending at 12 p.m. The church is located at 215 E. Main St., Rock Hill, SC 29730. The event is a partnership between Bishop Herbert C. Crump, Jr., Senior Pastor, the health care ministry and the Prostate Health Education Network, Inc., a nationwide patient education and advocacy organization.

Freedom Temple church is the thirteenth of a series of 21 prostate health symposia taking place in Boston, Nashville, Dallas, Oakland and other cities until October. All symposia are FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Lunch will b provided.

The symposia are a integral aspect of PHEN the no-profit organization dedicated to providing support and education to African American men. It was founded in 2003 by Thomas A. Farrington, a Massachusetts business and community leader who is now a 17-year prostate cancer survivor, and serves as PHEN president. There is currently a prostate cancer crisis in Black America, said Farrington. Black men have a 130 percent higher death rate than white men. It makes this the largest racial disparity for any type of major cancer among men or women.

Thank heaven for enlightened church partners like Freedom Temple Church who are willing to step up and help us educate men and their families about their prostate cancer risk, treatment and support strategies, so they can lead long and healthy lives, Farrington added.

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in African American men, behind lung cancer. When compared to all causes of death, prostate cancer is the fourth leading cause of death among African men over age 45. About one in five African American men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime, with the highest prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates in the United States.

The symposium will focus on specific prostate health topics including: screening and early detection, treatment options, diet and nutrition, managing treatment side effects, advance prostate cancer, and the importance of faith when facing cancer. The program is structured for health men at high risk for prostate cancer, prostate cancer survivors, caregivers, and family members. The FREE public event includes breakfast for all attendees, as well as prostate cancer screening.

This is a special opportunity for Freedom Temple Ministries, said Bishop Crump. It is critical for our congregation to be involved in raising awareness within our church, extended family and greater Rock Hill about prostate cancer, and show the connection between faith and healing when it comes to a prostate cancer diagnosis.

Those who plan to attend are encouraged to pre-register at:

http://prostatehealthed.org/symp/

About PHEN
The Prostate Health Education Network (PHEN) is the leading patient education and advocacy organization addressing the needs of African American prostate cancer patients and survivor. Based in Quincy, M, PHEN, a 501(3) organization founded in 2003, sponsors educational webcasts, the Annual Fathers Day Rally, education symposiums with church partners, and the Annual African American Prostate Cancer Disparity Summit in Washington, DC.

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Businesses in Rock Hill, South Carolina


A small percentage of the businesses listed on BlackCityInfo.com may not necessarily be black owned and operated but have received favorable reviews from users who have visited the establishment, or from the owners themselves who warmly seek out African American patronage.


BEAUTY CARE - HAIR SALONS - MULTICULTURAL

  1. Braids by Franche -  Category: Black Hair Salons -   875 Albright Road, Rock Hill, SC (803) 328-6540

  2. Dee & Lee Unique Hair Design -  Category: Black Hair Salons -  REVIEW: "great salon: Dee did my hair for a few years before I went off to college. If I was still back home I would still go to her to get my hair done. I recommend her to anyone."  - 155 E Main St, Rock Hill, SC (803) 980-1450

  3. Kreative Kreation -  Category: Black Hair Salons -   875 Albright Road, Rock Hill, SC (803) 366-8885

  4. Nefatiti Beauty Supply -  Category: Beauty Supply -   725 Cherry Road Ste. 123 Rock Hill, SC 29732

  5. Shabazz Barber & Styling College -  Category: Black Hair Salons -   218 West Black Street, Rock Hill, SC (803) 324-4511

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BLACK BUSINESSES - SERVICES - VENDORS ETC.

  1. Clinton Junior College -  Category: Historically Black College -   1029 Crawford Rd Rock Hill, SC 29730 (803) 327-7402x221  - (visit website)

  2. Glenda Malone -  Category: Educational Services -   603 Cotton Field Road Rock Hill, SC 29732 (803) 324-1221

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DINING - CATERING - BBQ - SOUL FOOD

  1. D J Restaurant -  Category: Soul Food Restaurants -  REVIEW: "Nice taste of southern home cooking. Nice taste of southern home cooking. DJ's is a nice place to sit down for a real, tasty southern style home cooked meal. The place itself is nothing fancy, paper plates and plastic forks, basic and plain in every way. But its clean and staff is all friendly, a real mom and pop type place."   - 120 E Mount Gallant Rd, Rock Hill, SC (803) 329-8400

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CITY VIDEO CONNECTION


Derion "DK" Kendrick '18 : South Pointe High (Rock Hill, SC) Junior Year Spotlight

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CHURCHES



  1. Adams Chapel AME Church -  950 West Main Street - Rock Hill, SC (803) 327-6015

  2. Catawba Chapel AME Zion -  340 State Highway 162 - Rock Hill, SC (803) 324-2549

  3. Foundation AME Zion Church -  1852 Neely Store Rd - Rock Hill, SC (803) 329-4343

  4. Hermon Presbyterian Church -  446 Dave Lyle BLVD - Rock Hill, SC 29731 (803) 327-6015

  5. Rock Grove AME Zion Church -  1460 Margaret St - Rock Hill, SC (803) 324-3586

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ANNUAL EVENTS



  1. By the Sweat of Our Brows
    (September)   Living history scenarios, games and songs. Rock Hill S.C. (803) 684- 2327   - (visit website)

    Annual educational event features African-American life and culture.


  2. Downtown Blues Festival
    (October)   Artists from the region performing in downtown shops and restaurants.   - (visit website)

    This three-day festival will have different performers each night.


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