Albany, New York






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A Taste of Albany, New York

did you know?
DID YOU KNOW THESE FACTS ABOUT ALBANY?

  1. Albany is the capital city of the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Albany County, and the central city of New York's Capital District. The population of the city was 97,856 at the time of the 2010 census.

  2. Albany has been a center of higher education for over a century, with much of the remainder of its economy dependent on state government and health care services. The city has experienced a rebound from the urban decline of the 1970s and 1980s, with noticeable development happening in the city's downtown and midtown neighborhoods. Albany is known for its extensive history, culture, architecture, and institutions of higher education. Albany has won the All-America City Award in both 1991 and 2009.

  3. The mid-to-late 20th century saw a rise in the African American population. As historian (and Albany Assemblyman) John McEneny puts it, "Dutch and Yankee, German and Irish, Polish and Italian, Black and Chinese—over the centuries Albany's heritage has reflected a succession of immigrant nationalities. Its streets have echoed with a dozen languages, its neighborhoods adapting to the distinctive life-style and changing economic fortunes of each new group.

  4. The median income for a household in the city in 2000 was $39,593, and the median income for a family was $41,562.

  5. The City School District of Albany (CSDA) operates the city's public school system, which consists of 18 schools and learning centers, in addition to 11 charter schools. The number of students in CSDA has steadily decreased since 2000. In the 2008–09 school year, 7,899 students were enrolled in the public school system. The district had an average class size of 18, an 81-percent graduation rate, and a 5-percent dropout rate. The district's 2010–11 budget is $202.8 million. Although considered by the state to be one of the lowest-achieving high schools in New York, Albany High was listed as the nation's 976th best high school in a 2010 Newsweek/Washington Post report.

  6. Albany's economy, along with that of the Capital District in general, is heavily dependent on government, health care, and education. Because of these typically steady economic bases, the local economy has been relatively immune to national economic recessions in the past. More than 25 percent of the city's population works in government-related positions.

  7. An artist paints tulips during the Tulip Fest at Washington ParkThe Tulip Festival, one of Albany's largest festivals, is set in Washington Park and celebrates the city's Dutch heritage. This traditional Albany event marks the beginning of spring as thousands of tulips bloom in the park in early May. Attendance to the festival in 2010 was approximately 80,000. Alive at 5 is a free, weekly concert series held downtown during the summer on Thursdays. With 10 concerts in 2010 total attendance was roughly 100,000.

  8. Smaller events include the African American Family Day Arts Festival each August at the Empire State Plaza; the Latin Fest, held each August at the Corning Preserve; the Albany Jazz Festival, an annual end-of-summer event held at the Corning Preserve; and Lark Fest, a music and art festival held each fall.

  9. Albany is located in the humid continental climate zone, and has cold, snowy winters, and hot, wet summers; the city experiences four distinct seasons.

Radio Stations

WGXC 90.7 FM 24.8 mi. Acra, NY Variety
WFLY 92.3 FM 11.1 mi. Troy, NY Top-40
WYAI 93.7 FM 19.9 mi. Scotia, NY Christian Contemporary
WAJZ 96.3 FM 11.3 mi. Voorheesville, NY Urban Contemporary
W248AX (WNGN) 97.5 FM 1.5 mi. Albany, NY Religious
WQAR 101.3 FM 24.8 mi. Stillwater, NY Adult Contemporary
WKKF 102.3 FM 15.7 mi. Ballston Spa, NY Top-40
WTMM 104.5 FM 15.7 mi. Mechanicville, NY Sports

hot991.com - Local Hip-Hop and R&B Station.Also available through the Radiopup App.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
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submitted articles

Watching The Rails: One Community’s Quest For Safety

When fossil fuel polluters need a place to do their dirtiest and most dangerous work, they tend to locate their operations in places where they believe people have less power, often in low-income communities or communities of color. Faced with a deadly new threat, residents in one predominately African-American community are organizing their neighbors and allies from far and wide—building the power to take on a Fortune 500 company and complacent regulators.

Please read entire article

Watching The Rails One Community’s Quest For Safety


Watching The Rails One Community’s Quest For Safety
School crossing guard Be Be White stops traffic on South Pearl Street for children, including his son Brayton and Sanaiya, both six years old.


Watching The Rails One Community’s Quest For Safety
Be Be White and his son Brayton stand along the fence that separates the railroad tracks from Ezra Prentice Homes.


Watching The Rails One Community’s Quest For Safety
Leatha, 13 years old, gives her mom, Angela Scott, a kiss outside their home at the Ezra Prentice Homes


Watching The Rails One Community’s Quest For Safety


Watching The Rails One Community’s Quest For Safety


Just as Be Be takes seriously his responsibility of looking out for the children in his community, our leaders must take their responsibilities seriously—to communities bearing the brunt of fossil fuel industry pollution and to future generations facing the threat of catastrophic climate change.

And when our leaders delay and equivocate between protecting people and protecting profits, we all have a role to play in pushing them to choose wisely.

The choice should be clear, says Be Be White. “This is our life. It’s worth more than a tank of oil.”

Please read entire article

Blog: http://earthjustice.org/blog/

(in Spanish: http://earthjustice.org/blog)

ooOoo


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Demographics of Albany, New York

By Race

White

Black

Native American

Asian

Hispanic

Total Population

57.01%

30.77%

0.30%

5.00%

8.58%

Because Hispanics could be counted in other races, the totals above could possibly be more than 100%. If you would like a detailed listing of all ethnic groups in the U.S., please Click Here.

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Famous Blacks from Albany, New York

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blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals blk/african american festivals


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Businesses in Albany, New York


A small percentage of the businesses listed on BlackCityInfo.com may not necessarily be black owned and operated but have received favorable reviews from users who have visited the establishment, or from the owners themselves who warmly seek out African American patronage.


BEAUTY CARE - HAIR SALONS - MULTICULTURAL

  1. Jonia -  Category: Black Hair Salon -  92 Lexington Avenue, Albany NY 12206 (866) 916-2138

  2. Shapes & Colors Hair Salons -  Category: Day Spa -   65 Wolf Rd # 2, Albany, NY 12205-1227 (518) 689-0300   - (visit website)

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BLACK BUSINESSES - SERVICES - VENDORS ETC.

  1. Recovery Support Services - Kevin M. Brown CARC -  Category: Addiction - The Recovery Support Services Introduction To Recovery Coaching Training© is a 1-day training focused on anyone interested in promoting recovery by removing barriers and obstacles to recovery and serving as a personal guide and mentor for people seeking or already in recovery.   90 McCarty Avenue Albany NY,12202 Albany, NY 12206 (518) 528-9140

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DINING - CATERING - BBQ - SOUL FOOD

  1. Barbara Jean's -  Category: Soul Food Restaurants -  72 Hurlbut St. Albany, NY (518) 434-0006   (518) 308-7290   - (visit website)

  2. Big John's Restaurant -  Category: Soul Food Restaurants -  51 Elizabeth St Albany, NY 12202 (518) 463-5972

  3. Simply Fish -  Category: Seafood Restaurants, Soul Food Restaurants -  147 S Pearl St # 1 Albany, NY 12202 (518) 463-3474

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CITY VIDEO CONNECTION


Beverly Bardequez shares African American history of Albany, New York

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D. Colin @ the African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region




The SOS Band@ The African American Day Festival Albany NY



Jobs from Indeed


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CHURCHES



  1. Bethany Baptist Church -  59 2nd St # 65, Albany, NY 12210-2516 (518) 462-0327 - (visit website)

  2. Israel AME Church -  381 Hamilton Street , Albany, NY 12210 (518) 463-8779

  3. Jordan Grove Missionary Baptist Church -  625 S Pearl St Albany NY 12202

  4. Morning Star Missionary Baptist Church -  159 Quail Street, Albany, NY 12203 (518) 436-7566

  5. Union Missionary Baptist Church -  3 Morton Ave, Albany, NY (518) 463-1559 - (visit website)

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ENTERTAINMENT



  1. Comedy Works -  Category: Entertainment -   200 Wolf Rd, Albany, NY 12205 (877) 565-3849 (518) 275-6897   - (visit website)

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ANNUAL EVENTS



  1. African American Family Day
    (August)   Location: NY at Empire State Plaza Madison Avenue - between Swan & Eagle Sts Albany, NY 12242   - (visit website)

    Celebrate a diverse blend of art, music, culture, and history with performances, food, vendors, and displays.


  2. Annual Juneteenth Celebration
    (June)   Location: Arbor Hill Community, 50 Lark St, Albany, New York   - (visit website)

    Juneteenth is a celebration where the whole family can enjoy great music, entertainment, educational information, free food and beverages, give-a-ways and more.


  3. Annual Capital Kwanzaa Celebration
    (December)   Location: At the New York State Museum (Madison Avenue, Albany NY) (518) 374-2683  - (visit website)

    The Hamilton Hill Arts Center is pleased to host its annual Kwanzaa celebration. Kwanzaa is an African-American celebrating family, community and culture. Celebrated from December 26th through January 1st, each day represents a different aspect of family, community and culture. This annual event embraces the African traditions of the Holiday Season as the Capital Region community comes together for an evening of arts, culture, family, and community spirit.

    Festivities planned for the event include libation, candle lighting and community award ceremonies. Entertainment will be provided by the Macedonia Men's Choir, Umoja African Dance and Drum Troupe, Hamilton Hill Steel Drum Band, poetry and more! There will be round table discussions dealing with the economy and financial well-being (in keeping with day's theme, children's activities (including arts and crafts and "All About Kwanzaa" discussion for kids) and more.


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