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Louisiana




Louisiana african american  city guide


Choose a city below and get locations for local Louisiana hair salons, soul food dining, radio stations, churches, places of entertainment, things to do, annual events, etc, all in the wonderful state of Louisiana.

 



CHOOSE A CITY:

Alexandria
Arnaudville
Athens
Baton Rouge
Bossier City
Breaux Bridge
Clarence
Cottonport
Eunice
Grambling
Gretna
Hammond
Houma
Jeanerette
Kenner
Lafayette
Lake Charles
Marrero
Monroe
Moreauville
Natchitoches
New Orleans
Opelousas
Shreveport
Sunset
Winnsboro



famous african americans

FAMOUS AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM LOUISIANA


 louisiana cusine

TRADITIONAL LOUISIANA FOODS


  • Southern Oxtail Soup
  • Lobster Creole
  • Crawfish étouffée
  • Eggs Sardou
  • Oysters Rockefeller
  • Creole Jambalaya
  • Shrimp Remoulade
  • Yakamein
  • Gumbo
  • Red Beans & Rice
  • Chicken Creole
  • Stuffed Bell Peppers
  • Quiche
  • Potato Salad
  • Bananas Foster



 

   

A TASTE OF LOUISIANA
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did you know?

DID YOU KNOW THESE FACTS ABOUT LOUISIANA?


  1. Louisiana population ranked 25th in the U.S. Total 4,533,372 (2010 est.)

  2. Some Louisiana urban environments have a multicultural, multilingual heritage, being so strongly influenced by an admixture of 18th century French, Spanish, Native American (Indian) and African cultures that they are considered to be somewhat exceptional in the U.S.

  3. Creole culture is a cultural amalgamation that takes a little from each of the French, Spanish, African, and Native American cultures. The Creole culture is part of White Creoles' and Black Creoles' culture. Originally Créoles referred to native-born whites of French-Spanish descent. Later the term also referred to descendants of the white men's relationships with black women, many of whom were educated free people of color. Many of the wealthy white men had quasi-permanent relationships with women of color outside their marriages, and supported them as "placées". If a woman was enslaved at the beginning of the relationship, the man usually arranged for her manumission, as well as that of any of her children.

  4. Creoles became associated with the New Orleans area, where the elaborated arrangements flourished. Most wealthy planters had houses in town as well as at their plantations. Popular belief that a Creole is a mixed Black / French person came from the "Haitian" connotation of an African French person. There were many immigrants from Haiti to New Orleans after the Revolution. Although a Black Creole is one type of Creole, it is not the only type, nor the original meaning of Creole. All of the respective cultures of the groups that settled in southern Louisiana have been combined to make one "New Orleans" culture. The creative combination of cultures from these groups, along with Native American culture, was called "Creole" Culture. It has continued as one of the dominant social, economic and political cultures of Louisiana, along with Cajun culture, well into the 20th century.

  5. Louisiana's population has the second largest proportion of black Americans (32.1% according to 2010 census) in the United States, behind neighboring Mississippi (36.3%). Official census statistics do not distinguish among people of African ancestry. Consequently, no distinction is made between those in Louisiana of English-speaking heritage and those of French-speaking heritage.

  6. The total gross state product in 2010 for Louisiana was US$213.6 billion, placing it 24th in the nation. Its per capita personal income is $30,952, ranking 41st in the United States.

  7. Louisiana has a humid subtropical climate, perhaps the most "classic" example of a humid subtropical climate of all the Southcentral states, with long, hot, humid summers and short, mild winters.

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submitted articles

Hundreds to Join New Orleans March to Declare, “Another Gulf is Possible”

- Gulf Coast Interdependence Day march to bring together community organizations and national allies calling for social, racial, economic and climate justice -

WHAT:   Hundreds of people will come together to march and declare “Another Gulf is Possible,” while demanding an end to the region’s treatment as a sacrifice zone. In the wake of recent flooding in Louisiana and climate catastrophes the region continues to face, the march will call attention to all forms of violence experienced in the region to demand radical change towards racial, social, economic and climate justice. “Another Gulf Is Possible” will demonstrate a spectacular vision of unity across movements with colorful visuals throughout the streets of New Orleans, stopping at sights of resistance including several monuments to white supremacy. The aim of this historic march is to highlight a just transition requiring an intersectional approach, moving away from economies relying on the extraction of natural and human resources, towards a vibrant and sustainable Gulf future.

WHEN:  The march will take place on Saturday, August 20th, 2016 at 10:30 AM, kicking off a week of resistance, solidarity and love led by grassroots communities of the Gulf Coast region.

WHERE:  A nearly three ­mile march through downtown New Orleans, starting at Lafayette Square and ending at the Mississippi River. Go to www.nonewleases.org for route information.

WHO:  Community­-based grassroots organizations, artists, national allies, workers, Indigenous tribal members, immigrant justice communities, faith leaders, students, young people and many other residents of the Gulf Coast region.

WHY:   The Gulf Coast includes the nexus of Cancer Alley, sinking land, the denial of federal recognition and respect for sovereign Indigenous nations and their territory. It’s also home to the first U.S. federally recognized climate migrants, the Isle de Jean Charles band of Biloxi­ Chitimacha ­Choctaw, who have lost 98 percent of their land to encroaching Gulf waters due largely to extractive drilling operations. This region remains one of the most impoverished in the nation despite the promise of good paying fossil fuel jobs. Yet plans proceed for increased sales of offshore drilling leases. Other climate vulnerable populations in the region include transgender citizens who often suffer most from unstable housing due to societal persecution, and poor people of color who are incarcerated in this state at the highest rates in the world. These overlapping issues of injustice require cross­ movement actions that lead to cross ­cutting solutions. This march will send a message that the people of the Gulf South stand united and firm to demand a just transition for the sake of the life and livelihoods of their communities, their cultures and their ecosystems while maintaining their right to dignity.

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submitted articles


Education

Yes, I travel 42,000 miles a year in my car throughout Louisiana and southern Mississippi promoting education.

The LSU Shreveport 100% online MBA is AACSB accredited and obtainable in one year: $13,284.36. No out of state tuition!

LSU Alexandria 100% online bachelor degree programs are in business, RN to BSN, eldercare administration and criminal justice. There is no out of state tuition.

I encourage everyone to begin, continue or advance their education through state institutions such as LSU Shreveport and LSU Alexandria. Thank you for helping me reach even more markets.

Kind regards, Gina

Gina Starnes, MSEd
Executive Director Louisiana
318-402-3002
gina.starnes@academicpartnerships.com

ooOoo


Disclaimer:
The articles on BlackCityinfo.com are provided as a community service and to be used for information purposes only. BlackCityinfo.com does not accept any responsibility or liability for the use or misuse of the article content. Use the above information with caution and at your own risk.

No Endorsement:
BlackCityinfo.com does not endorse or recommend any article on this site or any product, service or information found within said articles. Resources/links that may be included in said articles are only suggested as sources for the reader to explore but we can't confirm or take responsibility for it's accurateness. The opinions and views of the authors who have submitted articles to BlackCityinfo.com belong to them alone and do not necessarily reflect the views of BlackCityinfo.com.



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Cat Daddy is a radio DJ, restaurateur and owner of a used-car dealership in Shreveport. Visit with Cat Daddy and Rev Ricky L. Moore, see waitress Dorothy Stewart and other folks at his soul food restaurant in the Mooretown neighborhood.
 
Randy Newman "Louisiana 1927"
 
Louisiana Zydeco Live.
 
 
DEMOGRAPHICS & QUICK FACTS
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Demographics of Louisiana
By Race White Black American Indian Asian Hispanic
total population 64.77% 33.47% 0.97% 1.60% 2.52%

Because Hispanics could be counted in other races, the totals above could possibly be more than 100%. If you would like a detailed listing of all ethnic groups in the U.S., please Click Here.



    The Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO)


    The Black Alliance for Educational Options (BAEO) joined attorneys from Goldwater Institute, the American Federation for Children, and Louisiana parents today at a press conference announcing the filing of a motion to intervene in the Louisiana Scholarship Program Brumfield v. Dodd case. The press conference was held at the Hale Boggs Federal Courthouse in New Orleans.

    Represented by the Goldwater Institute, five Louisiana families and BAEO entered a motion asking a federal district court judge to dismiss the recent challenge by the US Department of Justice against the Louisiana Scholarship Program. The families and BAEO also asked to be allowed to join the state in defending the state scholarship program.

    “The Louisiana Scholarship Program gives children a chance for a better education – children who otherwise could not afford that opportunity, and when that is threatened for legal reasons without regard for how it might negatively affect children, it’s disgraceful and unacceptable.” said Kenneth Campbell, President of BAEO. “We are here to stand with the parents of Louisiana once again to let them know that they are not alone. BAEO will fight to help ensure that our children and the options available to them are protected.”

    The United States Department of Justice petitioned the federal courts in Louisiana last month to prevent students from participating in the Louisiana Scholarship Program in 34 school districts with open desegregation cases unless otherwise allowed by the federal judge overseeing the case. Starting in the 2014-15 school year, parents will need to receive permission from the applicable federal judge to receive a scholarship; thus, removing the option of educational choice from the parents and giving it to the federal courts.

    “This isn’t a matter of politics. Our children’s futures are at stake here. There should be no reason whatsoever to deny children from low-income families a state scholarship that allows them to attend schools that might better meet their needs.” said Campbell. “We would all like to attend schools that are racially and economically-diverse; however, that’s not the reality for most of our low-income and working-class Black families. The Louisiana Scholarship Program allows them to have an opportunity to receive a better education that could possibly change the trajectory of their lives. Do we really want to tell children they have to remain in a failing school simply because of their skin color?”

    BAEO is an advocacy organization whose mission is to increase access to high-quality educational options for Black children by actively supporting transformational education reform initiatives and parental choice policies that empower low-income and working-class Black families. BAEO champions parental choice policies and programs that serve low-income and working-class Black families, but is equally focused on promoting quality to ensure that Black students have access to high-performing schools. BAEO envisions a future where low-income and working-class Black families are empowered to choose a high-quality primary and secondary education for their children that enable them to pursue the college or career path of their choice, become economically independent adults, and engage in the practice of freedom.

ooOoo




Louisiana

Quick Facts:
  1. Louisiana ranks #49 as best states to live.  Source

  2. Percentage of black-owned firms, 12.2%

  3. 52.6% of Louisianians are female and 47.3% are male.


State Symbols:

Louisiana Flag
The Flag of the State of Louisiana


  • Flower - Magnolia
  • Bird - Eastern Brown Pelican
  • Song - “Give Me Louisiana” and “You Are My Sunshine”
  • Tree - Bald Cypress

    Nickname: Bayou State - Child of the Mississippi - Creole State - Pelican State (official) - Sportsman's Paradise - Sugar State

    Motto(s): Union, Justice and Confidence
    Capital: Baton Rouge


5 Largest Cities:
  1. New Orleans
  2. Baton Rouge
  3. Shreveport
  4. Lafayette
  5. Lake Charles
 






 
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